Bridgestone Super Bowl XLIII Halftime Show
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In my 40 plus years of working in radio there is one thing that I can guarantee and that is you can’t please everyone when it comes to music.  Regardless of the station and the format you will always find those who will ask the question….”why don’t you play good music.”  My response has always been “what’s good music?” and that will often lead to an interesting debate.

I thought of this while watching the Super Bowl halftime show and following Twitter at the same time.  The comments about Dr. Dre, Snoop Dog and Company were varied and for the most part connected with the age and other factors of those tweeting.  If you were under the age of 50 there is a good chance you liked the show because for many it was the rap/hip hop music they grew up with.  However old-timers like me were waxing poetic about the days of college marching bands and performers like “Up With People.”  Nobody really paid attention then as the halftime was when you got food and drink and went to the bathroom.  In full disclosure I was okay when Springsteen, Michael Jackson and Prince were featured but Sunday’s really did not resonate with me but who cares about a 66-year old male anyway?

So back to the subject of good music.  There is no definition and it’s simply a matter of personal opinion.  While some people have very varied tastes there are others who are a one-music format fan whether it be adult contemporary, country, classic rock, urban, contemporary hit radio, classic hits, golden oldies…even opera.  To each their personal favorite is what they call “good music” and again it’s a debate that can’t be won.

Back to the halftime show for a second.  It was certainly better than the train wreck performed last year by the Weeknd which I’m sure some people did like. As for next year who knows but I probably won’t like it.

Check Out the Best-Selling Album From the Year You Graduated High School

Do you remember the top album from the year you graduated high school? Stacker analyzed Billboard data to determine just that, looking at the best-selling album from every year going all the way back to 1956. Sales data is included only from 1992 onward when Nielsen's SoundScan began gathering computerized figures.

Going in chronological order from 1956 to 2020, we present the best-selling album from the year you graduated high school.