Gov, Phil Murphy wears a mask at a daily coronavirus briefing (Tariq Zehawi/The Record via AP, Pool)

Governor Murphy generally has received good grades when it comes to his handling of COVID-19 in New Jersey where he has moved slowly when it comes to re-opening the state.  Most agree with his “walk before you run” handling of the pandemic although in Ocean County it’s a slightly different story where many, especially business owners believe he has been too cautious.

The governor, who is an overwhelming favorite to win re-election to a second term in November, is clearly taking the conservative approach when it comes to wearing masks.  The CDC announced last week that those who are fully vaccinated no longer have to wear them inside or outside with only a few exceptions.  Initially both New Jersey & New York announced they were still requiring masks to be worn indoors but earlier this week neighboring Governor Andrew Cuomo lifted that mandate and I’m sure most expected New Jersey to follow.  However Murphy insists while we are close we are not there yet and that has upset many who would like to hold a mask-burning party ASAP.

I think I can speak for just about all of us when I say we have mask fatigue and am finding it harder and harder to put them on, especially if you’ve been fully vaccinated.  However as one person who is generally critical of Murphy said to me, “if we have to wait another week then so be it.”  He added that the governor has been consistent in that he does not lift restrictions until he’s comfortable and has not walked any of them back.

While Murphy has not said when he will indeed do away with the indoor mandate I believe it will come just after Memorial Day weekend.  And for as long as we’ve had to wear the darn things I can be patient for another week or so.  Meanwhile those of you who refuse to get the vaccine continue to do the public a disservice so get the shot…please.

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.