Willingboro pastor Robert Baldwin said he had to take down his online presence after a report said a group he heads up distributes a bleach-containing concoction to 50,000 people in Uganda — telling people it cures serious illnesses.

The concoction, called Miracle Mineral Solution or MMS, is pitched in poor areas of the East African nation as a "miracle cure" for HIV/AIDS and cancer, according to an investigation by the Guardian newspaper. Morgan oversees the distribution of 50,000 units of the product for a group called the Global Healing Christian Missions, despite it being denounced by the US Embassy in Uganda, according to the newspaper,

"We strongly condemn the distribution of this substance, which is extremely dangerous and is NOT a cure for any disease," read a message on the embassy's account.

The FDA also warns the bleach in MMS can "cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration." It says it has received reports of "severe nausea, vomiting, and life-threatening low blood pressure from dehydration."

Baldwin told NJ.com after the report was published on May 20 that he started get hate email and was forced to take down his group's website and social media.  Baldwin said that people "demonized" him because, in his view, people don't understand the science of MMS.

The report said that Baldwin promised priests cell phones if they were "committed" to distributing MMS. Baldwin showed the priests how to mix chlorine dioxide, a bleaching agent that is used in the textile industry.

After the report  was posted, Sam Little, a British man, was arrested by police in Uganda for having the ingredients for MMS and "intoxicating the public," according to the Guardian. In a video, he'd claimed it cures malaria.

The Uganda National Drug Authority told the Guardian that it has seized the chemicals found with Little upon his arrest for testing and if the concoction is found to not be healthy, he will face charges.

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