New Jersey is one of the capitols of accents in the world, and that is a wonderful thing. We have everything from international accents to the Brooklyn and Staten Island versions of the New York accent and so much more. But when we are asked if we have an accent, we always say no. But is that true.

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We did a little research and as much as we hate to admit it and as much as you hate to hear it, we do think the Garden State has an accent, and we have a group of words that we believe proves it.

Let's share with you the word pronunciations that we believe lead to the belief by those from outside the state that we have an accent.

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CAW-fee...in other states is "KAH-fee", but not here. The true sign of a New Jersey resident is their need and love for their coffee, and their ability to only say it the Jersey way.

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Dawg...If you own and love a "daag ", then you are not from New Jersey. Garden State residents love their dawgs like no one else. And we're proud we say it that way

Lou Russo,Townsquare Media

Ave...We don't like to say the whole word. It's Ocean Ave along the beach, Sunset Ave in Wanamassa and Princeton ave in Brick. Add the "nue" and you just might not be from New Jersey.

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Tawk.... In the Garden State, we don't have a "taak". We have a nice long tawk. And while we're tawking, that big bird is not a "haak", either.

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Chawklit. We're not a big chaa-KLUT bunch, but we do love our chawklit. A big piece of it and a glass of red wine, and we're ok with whatever the Jersey day just threw at us.

These are just a few examples, but you'd have to say after reading through this that is possible, just possible, that there is such a thing as a New Jersey accent, right? Or at least our own unique way of saying what we need to say.

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