Ok, so its official name is the Associated Humane Societies Popcorn Park Animal Refuge — and it is celebrating 45 years of rescuing animals.

To mark the occasion the refuge is having a celebration event at the Animal Refuge on Sep. 10 from 5-9 p.m.

As part of the festivities, the park will officially welcome the four new big cats they got in June:

Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
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Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
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Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
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Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
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According to Patch.com, the Popcorn Park Animal Refuge started in 1977 when a raccoon named Rigby was brought to the Humane Society with an injured leg that had been hurt when he was caught in a leg trap.

Since he was unsuitable to be released back into the wild, he stayed with the AHS and an animal refuge was born.

Now, the park is home to 200 rescued animals.

"We look forward to welcoming friends and supporters to celebrate this milestone and welcome our new additions to the Park. For forty-five years Popcorn Park has provided families with an opportunity to see and learn about the animals we have rescued and provide care for. There are few places like it on the East Coast," Jerry Rosenthal, CEO of Associated Humane Societies & Popcorn Park, said in a release.

The event costs $100 per person, including food and drink. Vegetarian and vegan options are available.

The attire is cocktail casual. Visit AHS online to purchase tickets.

Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
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Ok, so I’m not a big fan of capybaras, but the turtle is pretty awesome.

Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
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Troy the mini-horse is fond of the popcorn visitors share with him.

Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
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That’s an albino corn snake (I don’t know if he likes popcorn)

Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
Image via Popcorn Park Animal Refuge Facebook
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If you go to the park, be aware that there are many peacocks roaming around, which isn’t a problem unless one of them lets out a scream right behind you. Trust me, I know.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Doyle only.

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Remembering Caesar the White Tiger at Popcorn Park Zoo

The staff at the Popcorn Park Zoo is mourning the loss of Caesar, it's 20-year-old white tiger who dies at the end of March 2021. He came to the animal refuge in the Forked River section of Lacey Township in 2002 from a Texas sanctuary called Noah's Land with a bad case of ringworm and hardly any hair. He quickly became a strong presence at the zoo until he died in his sleep late in March.

The bass are biting in New Jersey fresh waters

Starting in mid to late May the largemouth bass started biting on my favorite lake. I finally got a chance to get out and see how good the fishing is this year and it didn't take long to catch. I got two bass in the first 10 minutes on the lake. We used to fish exclusively with live bait, either worms, nightcrawlers (the bigger worms), or minnows. That got too easy and it's not what "real" fishermen do.

It's more of a sport if you fool the fish into biting your hook with the right lure and the proper presentation. You have to figure out what they would be feeding on that time of year, pick a lure that resembles that and finesse it in a way that makes it look enticing to the fish. To most people, this is a stupid waste of time, but to those of us who caught the fishing bug as a kid or an adult, it's almost addictive. OK, it is addictive.

Most people look at a body of water such as a pond, lake, river, or stream and admire it for its natural beauty. Fishermen try to figure out what kind of fish are below the surface and what would be the best spot to catch them. If you have small kids and you know how to fish, you can create amazing memories and give a great lesson on nature. My dad and my uncles did that for me and those of some of the best memories of my childhood.

There are so many different kinds of fish and fishing in New Jersey's fresh waters. We usually think of fishing at the Jersey Shore, but there are plenty of fishing opportunities not far from where you live. Make sure you know a few simple rules and ask a local tackle shop for some good advice on what to buy and where to go, and you're good to go. It's a great way to enjoy the diversity of landscapes we have here and challenge yourself a little.

I challenged myself for the first time this season to try and catch a few bass on Thursday afternoon right before the rain and thunderstorms and had success right away in one of my favorite fishing holes in Medford.