CALDWELL — Cleanup was scheduled to begin Sunday at the borough's library, which is closed indefinitely due to extensive damage caused by Wednesday night's storm.

According to an update from the library, almost everything in the Children's Room is "past the point of recovery" due to flooding from Ida. Elsewhere, offices suffered significant damage, most equipment and furniture is ruined, and areas of the grounds surrounding the library have had to be roped off.

"Our historical books and archives is To Be Determined. Our priority is to recover what we can and move it to a safe location ASAP," the library says on its website.

According to the update, "the upstairs" area appears to be fine — whether the library can eventually open this area to the public has not yet been determined.

Much of Essex County received 6 to 8 inches of rain Wednesday into Thursday.

For now, patrons are being told to hold on to their library items — the library is not currently in a position to process returns and the book-drop location is locked.

For those who have access to the library's resources, or those who sign up for them, the digital library is open 24/7. Adult programs, which were already virtual, will still be offered remotely.

A remediation company has been through the library to secure what could be saved and to assess the damage.

"There are no words for how devastating this storm was for the library. We are relieved that no one was in the building," the library said.

The library announced on Sept. 2 that it would be closed indefinitely.

Contact reporter Dino Flammia at dino.flammia@townsquaremedia.com.

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